We are back with some news

Dear guests, our lives have recently been turned upside down by the spread of Covid-19. The return to normal will be slow and gradual and as hospitality operators we have adapted to the new reality to make your holidays safe.

As regulated by the anti-Covid-19 measures, our holiday home will follow Italy’s State and Region directives to create the conditions for a reassuring stay in Naples.

Only with everyone’s contribution we will be able to overcome this overwhelming crisis and therefore we ask you to respect the measures taken and the indications provided below.

Check-In / Out

  • Activated fast check-in and fast check-out mode, all guests will be required to provide copies of ID or passport via Whatsapp or email to reduce check-in times.
  • During your stay we will always be available virtually via Whatsapp for all your requests.

Hospitality

  • We will avoid shaking hands and we will respect social distances measures.
  • We will wear masks and gloves.
  • Before entering the house, the body temperature of all guests will be measured.
  • Upon entering the house you will be asked to sanitize your hands with the hand sanitiser made available to you.
  • Upon the check-in, greeting time will be reduced and you can use the material available at home and on our website for advice and useful information on managing the apartment and on your stay in Naples.
  • We recommend traveling light, remember that the apartment is on the third floor without a lift and in line with the provisions we will not be able to help you with your luggage.

Cleaning

  • Before guests arrive, the whole house is fully cleaned, disinfected and aired.
  • Sheets, pillow cases and towels are supplied and sanitized by a certified industrial laundry.
  • Objects, handles, buttons and remote controls are properly sanitized with specific products.
  • We had to remove some decorative items to comply with the cleaning regulations.
  • Before the guests arrive, the air conditioning system filters are sanitized.

Rules for guests

  • Respect the social distancing and wear the masks correctly when we meet for check-in.
  • Get informed and strictly comply with Italy’s State and Region directives.Wash or disinfect your hands frequently, even at home.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue in case of sneezing and coughing.
  • In case of fever or flu symptoms stay at home and notify us immediately.
  • Throw away any used masks, gloves and tissues in the undifferentiated container, remembering to take out the garbage before check-out.
  • Do not leave products in the fridge or other food remains in the home.
  • Put the used laundry back in the bags made available and close them before leaving.
  • Turn off all the air conditioners and open all the windows to ventilate the apartment before leaving.

In the implementation of these measures, our guests declare to be aware of the Covid-19 containment measures currently in force in regards to the limitations on the possibility of movement of persons throughout the national territory and to take full responsibility for themselves and their companions.
And thus declare:

  • Not to be subjected to the quarantine measurement, or not to have tested positive for Covid-19.
  • Not to have knowingly been in contact with persons who have tested positive of Covid-19 in the last 14 days.
  • Not to have a body temperature above 37.5°C or other flu symptoms.

About suspicious or positive cases

  • Should our guests experience symptoms of flu, fever, etc., while staying in our holiday home, despite all the precautions above mentioned, they will have to immediately let us know and they will need to leave the apartment. We will contact the Local Health Authority who will carry out a health assessment and will implement the consequent provisions as set out by the Italian law.
  • Also the other members of group or family must leave the apartment to return to their home.
  • Guests can stay for the time necessary for the organization, but already in isolation.
  • Our guests will be charged for any additional costs and any additional nights spent in our home to organize their return home or to self-isolate .

An anticipated thank you for your understanding and collaboration and a wish for a pleasant stay in Naples and at Interno16HolidayHome.

When Life gets back to normal

When Life gets back to normal… We are here to offer you the comforts of home.
Patience is important but more importantly take this time to spend quality time and to stay safe.
Our home away from home… awaits for you and yours!

Traveller Review Award 2020

It is with great pleasure that we want to celebrate the Booking Traveller Review Award!
Congratulations to us!

The Booking.com Traveller Review Awards is an annual appreciation programme that recognises partners for their exceptional hospitality, as evidenced in the review scores left by travellers after their stay or experience. The 2020 edition review score is based on the average score of all guest reviews published on the Booking.com website and app between 30 October 2017 and 30 October 2019. 

New Year’s in Naples: what to do and where to go to toast the new year

Celebrate the new year and start off on the right foot: here are some original ideas to toast the new year in the Neapolitan city.

New Year’s Eve in Naples: a whole party

In Naples, the New Year is a big outdoor party. On the streets of the center, in Piazza del Plebiscito, where the concert is held and at midnight on the 31st street towards Castel dell’Ovo to greet the new year with a incredible fireworks.

The party continues, until dawn the following day, on the Naples seafront, from Mergellina to Borgo Marinari where five stages will be set up between via Caracciolo and via Partenope which will host artists, bands and discos in the open.

At the Rotonda Diaz instead there will be the traditional appointment with the daredevils who will dive into the waters of the Gulf to greet the new year.

A must for those who want to spend it in a club on the 31st is Arenile di Bagnoli: here every year the Neapolitan New Year is celebrated with an unforgettable party.

For a dinner party, the board is the Posillipo Theater which organizes a dinner and disco after midnight.

The alternative to dinners and parties is the San Carlo Theater with the wonderful performance of Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker.

The best traditional trattorias in Naples not to be missed

One of the questions our guests often ask to us is “But if we are tired of eating pizza… where can we eat some tasty in the historic center?
There are many trattorias that offer ragù, spaghetti with seafood, Genovese and many other goodies of the Neapolitan culinary tradition just a few steps from our apartment. These are traditional dishes at very low prices: it is difficult to exceed 20 euros. These are our favorites.
One rule: these are all less than 10 minutes walk from our holiday home!

ANTICA OSTERIA PISANO

Since 1947 a small Neapolitan gastronomic legend. Antica osteria Pisano offers not only the traditional and delicious flavors of classic Neapolitan cuisine but also innovative dishes proposed by the resident chef.
Where: Piazzetta Crocelle ai Mannesi 1. 
Tel.: +39 081 554 83 25
Open for lunch and dinner. Closed on Sundays.

ANTICA TRATTORIA DA CARMINE

The trattoria is located right on Via dei Tribunali which we can define as the “tasty road” in Naples. Unlike most places in the historic center, this is a medium-sized restaurant. Compared to a classic trattoria, “Da Carmine” presents definitely much more choice. It is interesting to note how one moves from humble, albeit delicious, pasta and potatoes with provola to more elaborate and expensive fish dishes.
Where: Via dei Tribunali 330 
Tel.: +39 081 29 43 83
Open only for lunch on Tuesday and Sunday, for lunch and for dinner on other days. Closed on Mondays.

LA CANTINA DI VIA SAPIENZA

Since 1900 typical Neapolitan cuisine where you can taste the best local specialties. Just mention its famous eggplant parmigiana but without forgetting the gnocchi alla sorrentina, the mezzani alla genovese, the pasta with potatoes and provola which alternate from day to day in a menu that is never the same, offering variations of first courses according to the day of the week . Among the main dish to include the cod and fried anchovies for gourmets!
Where: Via della Sapienza 40
Tel.: +39 081 45 90 78
Open for lunch only. Closed on Sundays.

LA TAVERNA A SANTA CHIARA

A typical restaurant overlooking the cloister of the monastery of the same name in the historic center of Naples, which has made a true trademark of the skilful combination of traditional cuisine and modern forays. The management, familiar and friendly but at the same time attentive to the innovations of the sector, allows those who choose to stop in the restaurant to discover the true food and wine soul of the city. Do not miss the pasta and peas.
Where: Via Santa Chiara 6
Tel .: +39 081 048 49 08
Open for lunch and dinner. Closed on Mondays.

OSTERIA DA CARMELA

The Osteria was established in 1967 under the Bellini theater, one of the most famous in the city. The first course are the canonical ones: magnificent pasta and chickpeas and linguine with sauté. Among the main dishes, the Genovese meat, the spinach and ricotta crocché, the fish balls, the luciana octopus. To do at the moment grilled meat, or sea bass with acqua pazza with potatoes.
Where: Via Conte di Ruvo, 12 
Tel.: +39 081 549 97 38
Open for lunch and dinner every day.

OSTERIA LA CHITARRA

This place is really a treasure chest of memory, a place of the heart. Here there are signs of the rare and hard to find history of Naples. A dozen tables arranged to optimize the number of seatings, terracotta flooring, warm walls, photos, postcards and above all a guitar on the wall. From cotica to pasta and beans, the coroniello, the selection of meats and cheeses, the wines have been the passion of the managers for almost 25 years.
Where: Rampe San Giovanni Maggiore 1/bis
Tel.: +39 081 552 91 03
Open for dinner. Closed on Sundays.

‘A LUCIANELLA

Typical restaurant of Neapolitan cuisine and seafood specialties, where you can enjoy classic dishes interpreted artfully by talented chefs who compose dishes such as pasta and beans at sea.
Where: Vico Cinquesanti 29
Tel.: +39 081 29 50 68
Open for lunch and dinner every day.

The 6 most beautiful churches in Naples.

The tour of the churches of Naples would be endless! We have chosen 6, certainly among the most beautiful. Are you ready? Go!

Chiesa del Gesù Nuovo
The church is the final resting place of much-loved local saint Giuseppe Moscati (1880–1927), a doctor who served the city’s poor. Adjacent to the right transept, the Sale di San Giuseppe Moscati (Rooms of St Joseph Moscati) include a recreation of the great man’s study, complete with the armchair in which he died. Scan the walls for ex-voti, gifts offered by the faithful for miracles purportedly received. The church itself received a miracle of sorts on 4 August 1943, when a bomb dropped on the site failed to explode. Its shell is aptly displayed beside the ex-voti. The church flanks the northern side of beautiful Piazza del Gesù Nuovo, a favourite late-night hang-out for students and lefties. At its centre soars Giuseppe Genuino’s lavish Guglia dell’Immacolata, an obelisk built between 1747 and 1750. On 8 December, the Feast of the Immacolata, a firefighter scrambles up to the top to place a wreath on the statue of the Virgin Mary.

Monastero di Santa Chiara
Vast, Gothic and cleverly deceptive, the mighty Basilica di Santa Chiara stands at the heart of this tranquil monastery complex. The church was severely damaged in WWII: what you see today is a 20th-century recreation of Gagliardo Primario’s 14th-century original. Adjoining it are the basilica’s cloisters, adorned with brightly coloured 17th-century majolica tiles and frescoes.

Chiesa di San Giovanni a Carbonara
Sumptuous sculpture and Technicolor frescoes makes this Gothic church worth a detour. Andrea de Firenze, Tuscan sculptors and northern-Italian artists collaborated on the Gothic-Renaissance mausoleum of King Ladislas, soaring 18m behind the main altar. Behind it, the circular Cappella Caracciolo del Sole uplifts with its vivid 15th-century frescoes and Leonardo da Besozzo’s tomb for Giovanni Caracciolo, the ambitious lover of King Ladislas’ sister Queen Joan II of Naples.

Basilica di San Lorenzo Maggiore
The basilica at this richly layered religious complex is deemed one of Naples’ finest medieval buildings. Aside from Ferdinando Sanfelice’s facade, the Cappella al Rosario and the Cappellone di Sant’Antonio, its baroque makeover was stripped away last century to reveal its austere, Gothic elegance. Beneath the basilica is a sprawl of extraordinary Graeco-Roman ruins, accessible on a one-hour guided tour. To better understand the ruins, start your explorations in the Museo dell’Opera di San Lorenzo Maggiore, which includes a model of the area as it appeared in ancient times. The ruins themselves will see you walking past ancient bakeries, wineries, laundries and barrel-vaulted rooms that once formed part of the city’s two-storey macellum (market). Above them, the basilica itself was commenced in 1270 by French architects, who built the apse. Local architects took over the following century, recycling ancient columns in the nave. Catherine of Austria, who died in 1323, is buried here in a beautiful mosaiced tomb. Legend has it that this was where Boccaccio first fell for Mary of Anjou, the inspiration for his character Fiammetta, while the poet Petrarch called the adjoining convent home in 1345.

Chiesa di Sant’Anna dei Lombardi
This magnificent church is testament to the close links that once existed between the Neapolitan Aragonese and the Florentine Medici dynasty. One particular highlight is Guido Mazzoni’s spectacular Pietà. Dating from 1492, the terracotta ensemble is made up of eight life-size terracotta figures surrounding the lifeless body of Christ. Originally the figures were painted, but even without colour they still make quite an impression. Also impressive is baroque painter Francesco Solimena’s arresting depiction of St Christopher. The sacristy is a work of art in itself. The walls are graced with gloriously inlaid wood panels by Giovanni da Verona, while the ceiling bursts with 16th-century frescoes by Giorgio Vasari depicting the Allegories and Symbols of Faith.

Duomo di Napoli
Whether you go for Giovanni Lanfranco’s fresco in the Cappella di San Gennaro (Chapel of St Janarius), the 4th-century mosaics in the baptistry, or the thrice-annual miracle of San Gennaro, do not miss Naples’ cathedral. Kick-started by Charles I of Anjou in 1272 and consecrated in 1315, it was largely destroyed in a 1456 earthquake. It has had copious nips and tucks over the subsequent centuries.
Among these is the gleaming neo-Gothic facade, only completed in 1905. Step inside and you’ll immediately notice the central nave’s gilded coffered ceiling, studded with late-mannerist art. The high sections of the nave and the transept are the work of baroque overachiever Luca Giordano.
Off the right side of the nave, the Cappella di San Gennaro (also known as the Chapel of the Treasury) was designed by Theatine priest and architect Francesco Grimaldi, and completed in 1646. The most sought-after artists of the period worked on the chapel, creating one of Naples’ greatest baroque legacies. Highlights here include Jusepe de Ribera’s gripping canvas St Gennaro Escaping the Furnace Unscathed and Giovanni Lanfranco’s dizzying dome fresco. Hidden away in a strongbox behind the altar is a 14th-century silver bust in which sit the skull of San Gennaro and the two phials that hold his miraculously liquefying blood.
The next chapel eastwards contains an urn with the saint’s bones and a cupboard full of femurs, tibias and fibulas. Below the high altar is the Cappella Carafa, a Renaissance chapel built to house yet more of the saint’s remains.
Off the left aisle lies the 4th-century Basilica di Santa Restituta, the subject of an almost complete makeover after the earthquake of 1688. From it you can access the Battistero di San Giovanni in Fonte. Western Europe’s oldest baptistry, it’s encrusted with fragments of glittering 4th-century mosaics.
The Duomo’s subterranean archaeological zone, which includes fascinating remains of Greek and Roman buildings and roads, remains closed indefinitely.

Naples Travel Tip: The Campania ArteCard

Like a lot of cities and travel destinations, it’s possible to purchase a discount card in Naples that enables you to have free/discounted access to various historical and cultural sites around the city. Sometimes these things are worth it, sometimes they are not.

In Naples however, I would strongly advise picking up a Campania ArteCard swiftly after arriving in the city. It can be purchased at the airport, and at the ticket office of various tourist sites (at the archaeological museum, at Pompeii, etc).

There are variations of the Campania Artecard available and the most suitable will depend on your personal interests and your intended Naples itinerary.

The cards allow free access to some sites, free use of public transportation, and reduced entry at additional sites. Prices start from €12 for those under 25, and €21 for those over 25. Either way, it will save you a fair bit.

Cross Piazza del Plebiscito with your eyes closed.

The purpose of this game is managing to go between the equestrian statues in the center of the square, sculpted by Antonio Canova and depicting Charles III of Bourbon and Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies.

Rules of the game: close your eyes or wear a blindfold. Procedure: starting from the gate of Palazzo Reale, walk straight for about 170 meters. Do not be surprised if, on opening your eyes, you realize not only that you have not managed to cross the space between the two statues, but that you are somewhere else entirely.

According to legend, it is all Queen Margherita’s fault: she is said to have granted a pardon to the prisoners of the Kingdom who passed this test, however, a curse launched by the Queen herself prevented the competitors from being successful.
As a matter of fact, the particular conformation of the square, with its surface of not perfectly linear cobblestones, hinders walking in a straight line, making this a very difficult thing to do in Naples with kids, especially during the night.

Casatiello Napoletano. The King of Easter in Napoli.

There are two things that are synonymous with Easter in Napoli – Pastiera – the ricotta and wheat based pie that is like a cheesecake on steroids and its equally indulgent antithesis – the rustic and savoury Casatiello Napoletano. Think of them as the yin and the yang or the Adam and Eve of the Neapolitan Easter table.

A type of rustico, or a rustic bread, Casatiello is hardy, filling, and oh so satisfying. Something I would think of more as a comfort food for the cold, wet days of winter, here it is nevertheless a symbol of spring.  Made only for the Easter holiday, its brother Tòrtano however is made year round.

Two breads cut from the same dough, the only difference between them – hard-boiled eggs. Perhaps symbolic of creation, I can only guess the addition of eggs to Casatiello render it suitable only for the Easter holiday. Made in a round pan similar to an American bundt pan, the shape is said to symbolize the crown of thorns.

The recipe dates to at least the 1600s and they say, the Napoletani that is, that it is not Casatiello without sugna (or strutto in Italian) – pork fat/lard. Served as part of the antipasti on Easter day, it tastes even better the next day, Pasquetta – Easter Monday.

The first step in any good Casatiello? The ingredients.

Flour, lievito – fresh yeast sold in little cubes, water, salt, pepper, and most importantly, sugna for the dough. Hard boiled eggs and an assortment of salumi and cheese inside.

To make Casatiello with 1 kg flour we recommended “un mezzo chilo di misto,” – a 1/2 kg of assorted salumi and cheese. For our Casatiello we chopped up some ciccioli, capicollo, salame napoletano, and pancetta coppata. Pecorino cheese is typically used but this time we are using a Caciotta di Avellino.

Ingredients

For the dough
1 kg flour plus extra for rolling the dough.
300 ml Water.
1 cake (.6 oz) fresh yeast or one package or 2 1/4 tsp active dry yeast.
Warm water.
Salt and pepper.
About 4 tbsp of lard for the dough plus more for coating the dough.

For the filling
1/2 kg assorted salumi and cheese.
6 hard-boiled eggs.

Cooking Method

Pour flour onto a work surface.
Mix in salt and a very generous amount of pepper.
Add yeast (if you are using active dry yeast you will need to dissolve it in about  1/2 cup warm water first).
Add water a little bit at a time, working it in until a soft dough begins to form.
Add the lard and work it completely into the dough.
Continue working the dough, adding water as needed until the dough is just slightly damp and very elastic.
Cover with a kitchen towel and let rise 2 hr or more.

The Casatiello dough after the first rise

Meanwhile chop the salumi and cheese
Boil and chop the eggs and add them to the salumi mixture

After the dough has risen one hour, flour the work surface and roll it out into a large rectangular form.

Spread the salumi mixture across the length of the dough starting near the bottom of the dough.  

Roll the dough up like a cigar, pinch the edges and coat them with lard.

Roll up the Casatiello

Bring the ends together to form a circular shape.

Grease the Casatiello pan with lard, work the dough into the pan and generously coat the top of the dough with lard.

Cover and let rise 3 hours.

Casatiello after the second rise

Bake at 180º C for approximately 1 1/2 to 2 hours.

Buon Appetito!