The best traditional trattorias in Naples not to be missed

One of the questions our guests often ask to us is “But if we are tired of eating pizza… where can we eat some tasty in the historic center?
There are many trattorias that offer ragù, spaghetti with seafood, Genovese and many other goodies of the Neapolitan culinary tradition just a few steps from our apartment. These are traditional dishes at very low prices: it is difficult to exceed 20 euros. These are our favorites.
One rule: these are all less than 10 minutes walk from our holiday home!

ANTICA OSTERIA PISANO

Since 1947 a small Neapolitan gastronomic legend. Antica osteria Pisano offers not only the traditional and delicious flavors of classic Neapolitan cuisine but also innovative dishes proposed by the resident chef.
Where: Piazzetta Crocelle ai Mannesi 1. 
Tel.: +39 081 554 83 25
Open for lunch and dinner. Closed on Sundays.

ANTICA TRATTORIA DA CARMINE

The trattoria is located right on Via dei Tribunali which we can define as the “tasty road” in Naples. Unlike most places in the historic center, this is a medium-sized restaurant. Compared to a classic trattoria, “Da Carmine” presents definitely much more choice. It is interesting to note how one moves from humble, albeit delicious, pasta and potatoes with provola to more elaborate and expensive fish dishes.
Where: Via dei Tribunali 330 
Tel.: +39 081 29 43 83
Open only for lunch on Tuesday and Sunday, for lunch and for dinner on other days. Closed on Mondays.

LA CANTINA DI VIA SAPIENZA

Since 1900 typical Neapolitan cuisine where you can taste the best local specialties. Just mention its famous eggplant parmigiana but without forgetting the gnocchi alla sorrentina, the mezzani alla genovese, the pasta with potatoes and provola which alternate from day to day in a menu that is never the same, offering variations of first courses according to the day of the week . Among the main dish to include the cod and fried anchovies for gourmets!
Where: Via della Sapienza 40
Tel.: +39 081 45 90 78
Open for lunch only. Closed on Sundays.

LA TAVERNA A SANTA CHIARA

A typical restaurant overlooking the cloister of the monastery of the same name in the historic center of Naples, which has made a true trademark of the skilful combination of traditional cuisine and modern forays. The management, familiar and friendly but at the same time attentive to the innovations of the sector, allows those who choose to stop in the restaurant to discover the true food and wine soul of the city. Do not miss the pasta and peas.
Where: Via Santa Chiara 6
Tel .: +39 081 048 49 08
Open for lunch and dinner. Closed on Mondays.

OSTERIA DA CARMELA

The Osteria was established in 1967 under the Bellini theater, one of the most famous in the city. The first course are the canonical ones: magnificent pasta and chickpeas and linguine with sauté. Among the main dishes, the Genovese meat, the spinach and ricotta crocché, the fish balls, the luciana octopus. To do at the moment grilled meat, or sea bass with acqua pazza with potatoes.
Where: Via Conte di Ruvo, 12 
Tel.: +39 081 549 97 38
Open for lunch and dinner every day.

OSTERIA LA CHITARRA

This place is really a treasure chest of memory, a place of the heart. Here there are signs of the rare and hard to find history of Naples. A dozen tables arranged to optimize the number of seatings, terracotta flooring, warm walls, photos, postcards and above all a guitar on the wall. From cotica to pasta and beans, the coroniello, the selection of meats and cheeses, the wines have been the passion of the managers for almost 25 years.
Where: Rampe San Giovanni Maggiore 1/bis
Tel.: +39 081 552 91 03
Open for dinner. Closed on Sundays.

‘A LUCIANELLA

Typical restaurant of Neapolitan cuisine and seafood specialties, where you can enjoy classic dishes interpreted artfully by talented chefs who compose dishes such as pasta and beans at sea.
Where: Vico Cinquesanti 29
Tel.: +39 081 29 50 68
Open for lunch and dinner every day.

On the hunt for gluten free in Napoli? Click here!

The 6 most beautiful churches in Naples.

The tour of the churches of Naples would be endless! We have chosen 6, certainly among the most beautiful. Are you ready? Go!

Chiesa del Gesù Nuovo
The church is the final resting place of much-loved local saint Giuseppe Moscati (1880–1927), a doctor who served the city’s poor. Adjacent to the right transept, the Sale di San Giuseppe Moscati (Rooms of St Joseph Moscati) include a recreation of the great man’s study, complete with the armchair in which he died. Scan the walls for ex-voti, gifts offered by the faithful for miracles purportedly received. The church itself received a miracle of sorts on 4 August 1943, when a bomb dropped on the site failed to explode. Its shell is aptly displayed beside the ex-voti. The church flanks the northern side of beautiful Piazza del Gesù Nuovo, a favourite late-night hang-out for students and lefties. At its centre soars Giuseppe Genuino’s lavish Guglia dell’Immacolata, an obelisk built between 1747 and 1750. On 8 December, the Feast of the Immacolata, a firefighter scrambles up to the top to place a wreath on the statue of the Virgin Mary.

Monastero di Santa Chiara
Vast, Gothic and cleverly deceptive, the mighty Basilica di Santa Chiara stands at the heart of this tranquil monastery complex. The church was severely damaged in WWII: what you see today is a 20th-century recreation of Gagliardo Primario’s 14th-century original. Adjoining it are the basilica’s cloisters, adorned with brightly coloured 17th-century majolica tiles and frescoes.

Chiesa di San Giovanni a Carbonara
Sumptuous sculpture and Technicolor frescoes makes this Gothic church worth a detour. Andrea de Firenze, Tuscan sculptors and northern-Italian artists collaborated on the Gothic-Renaissance mausoleum of King Ladislas, soaring 18m behind the main altar. Behind it, the circular Cappella Caracciolo del Sole uplifts with its vivid 15th-century frescoes and Leonardo da Besozzo’s tomb for Giovanni Caracciolo, the ambitious lover of King Ladislas’ sister Queen Joan II of Naples.

Basilica di San Lorenzo Maggiore
The basilica at this richly layered religious complex is deemed one of Naples’ finest medieval buildings. Aside from Ferdinando Sanfelice’s facade, the Cappella al Rosario and the Cappellone di Sant’Antonio, its baroque makeover was stripped away last century to reveal its austere, Gothic elegance. Beneath the basilica is a sprawl of extraordinary Graeco-Roman ruins, accessible on a one-hour guided tour. To better understand the ruins, start your explorations in the Museo dell’Opera di San Lorenzo Maggiore, which includes a model of the area as it appeared in ancient times. The ruins themselves will see you walking past ancient bakeries, wineries, laundries and barrel-vaulted rooms that once formed part of the city’s two-storey macellum (market). Above them, the basilica itself was commenced in 1270 by French architects, who built the apse. Local architects took over the following century, recycling ancient columns in the nave. Catherine of Austria, who died in 1323, is buried here in a beautiful mosaiced tomb. Legend has it that this was where Boccaccio first fell for Mary of Anjou, the inspiration for his character Fiammetta, while the poet Petrarch called the adjoining convent home in 1345.

Chiesa di Sant’Anna dei Lombardi
This magnificent church is testament to the close links that once existed between the Neapolitan Aragonese and the Florentine Medici dynasty. One particular highlight is Guido Mazzoni’s spectacular Pietà. Dating from 1492, the terracotta ensemble is made up of eight life-size terracotta figures surrounding the lifeless body of Christ. Originally the figures were painted, but even without colour they still make quite an impression. Also impressive is baroque painter Francesco Solimena’s arresting depiction of St Christopher. The sacristy is a work of art in itself. The walls are graced with gloriously inlaid wood panels by Giovanni da Verona, while the ceiling bursts with 16th-century frescoes by Giorgio Vasari depicting the Allegories and Symbols of Faith.

Duomo di Napoli
Whether you go for Giovanni Lanfranco’s fresco in the Cappella di San Gennaro (Chapel of St Janarius), the 4th-century mosaics in the baptistry, or the thrice-annual miracle of San Gennaro, do not miss Naples’ cathedral. Kick-started by Charles I of Anjou in 1272 and consecrated in 1315, it was largely destroyed in a 1456 earthquake. It has had copious nips and tucks over the subsequent centuries.
Among these is the gleaming neo-Gothic facade, only completed in 1905. Step inside and you’ll immediately notice the central nave’s gilded coffered ceiling, studded with late-mannerist art. The high sections of the nave and the transept are the work of baroque overachiever Luca Giordano.
Off the right side of the nave, the Cappella di San Gennaro (also known as the Chapel of the Treasury) was designed by Theatine priest and architect Francesco Grimaldi, and completed in 1646. The most sought-after artists of the period worked on the chapel, creating one of Naples’ greatest baroque legacies. Highlights here include Jusepe de Ribera’s gripping canvas St Gennaro Escaping the Furnace Unscathed and Giovanni Lanfranco’s dizzying dome fresco. Hidden away in a strongbox behind the altar is a 14th-century silver bust in which sit the skull of San Gennaro and the two phials that hold his miraculously liquefying blood.
The next chapel eastwards contains an urn with the saint’s bones and a cupboard full of femurs, tibias and fibulas. Below the high altar is the Cappella Carafa, a Renaissance chapel built to house yet more of the saint’s remains.
Off the left aisle lies the 4th-century Basilica di Santa Restituta, the subject of an almost complete makeover after the earthquake of 1688. From it you can access the Battistero di San Giovanni in Fonte. Western Europe’s oldest baptistry, it’s encrusted with fragments of glittering 4th-century mosaics.
The Duomo’s subterranean archaeological zone, which includes fascinating remains of Greek and Roman buildings and roads, remains closed indefinitely.

Naples Travel Tip: The Campania ArteCard

Like a lot of cities and travel destinations, it’s possible to purchase a discount card in Naples that enables you to have free/discounted access to various historical and cultural sites around the city. Sometimes these things are worth it, sometimes they are not.

In Naples however, I would strongly advise picking up a Campania >artecard swiftly after arriving in the city.

You can buy your pass online, on the >artecard app, at an >artecard point and at the ticket office of various tourist sites (at the Archaeological Museum, at Pompeii, etc)

There are variations of the Campania Artecard available and the most suitable will depend on your personal interests and your intended Naples itinerary.

The cards allow free access to some sites, free use of public transportation, and reduced entry at additional sites. Prices start from €12 for those under 25, and €21 for those over 25. Either way, it will save you a fair bit.

Cross Piazza del Plebiscito with your eyes closed.

The purpose of this game is managing to go between the equestrian statues in the center of the square, sculpted by Antonio Canova and depicting Charles III of Bourbon and Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies.

Rules of the game: close your eyes or wear a blindfold. Procedure: starting from the gate of Palazzo Reale, walk straight for about 170 meters. Do not be surprised if, on opening your eyes, you realize not only that you have not managed to cross the space between the two statues, but that you are somewhere else entirely.

According to legend, it is all Queen Margherita’s fault: she is said to have granted a pardon to the prisoners of the Kingdom who passed this test, however, a curse launched by the Queen herself prevented the competitors from being successful.
As a matter of fact, the particular conformation of the square, with its surface of not perfectly linear cobblestones, hinders walking in a straight line, making this a very difficult thing to do in Naples with kids, especially during the night.

Casatiello Napoletano. The King of Easter in Napoli.

There are two things that are synonymous with Easter in Napoli – Pastiera – the ricotta and wheat based pie that is like a cheesecake on steroids and its equally indulgent antithesis – the rustic and savoury Casatiello Napoletano. Think of them as the yin and the yang or the Adam and Eve of the Neapolitan Easter table.

A type of rustico, or a rustic bread, Casatiello is hardy, filling, and oh so satisfying. Something I would think of more as a comfort food for the cold, wet days of winter, here it is nevertheless a symbol of spring.  Made only for the Easter holiday, its brother Tòrtano however is made year round.

Two breads cut from the same dough, the only difference between them – hard-boiled eggs. Perhaps symbolic of creation, I can only guess the addition of eggs to Casatiello render it suitable only for the Easter holiday. Made in a round pan similar to an American bundt pan, the shape is said to symbolize the crown of thorns.

The recipe dates to at least the 1600s and they say, the Napoletani that is, that it is not Casatiello without sugna (or strutto in Italian) – pork fat/lard. Served as part of the antipasti on Easter day, it tastes even better the next day, Pasquetta – Easter Monday.

The first step in any good Casatiello? The ingredients.

Flour, lievito – fresh yeast sold in little cubes, water, salt, pepper, and most importantly, sugna for the dough. Hard boiled eggs and an assortment of salumi and cheese inside.

To make Casatiello with 1 kg flour we recommended “un mezzo chilo di misto,” – a 1/2 kg of assorted salumi and cheese. For our Casatiello we chopped up some ciccioli, capicollo, salame napoletano, and pancetta coppata. Pecorino cheese is typically used but this time we are using a Caciotta di Avellino.

Ingredients

For the dough
1 kg flour plus extra for rolling the dough.
300 ml Water.
1 cake (.6 oz) fresh yeast or one package or 2 1/4 tsp active dry yeast.
Warm water.
Salt and pepper.
About 4 tbsp of lard for the dough plus more for coating the dough.

For the filling
1/2 kg assorted salumi and cheese.
6 hard-boiled eggs.

Cooking Method

Pour flour onto a work surface.
Mix in salt and a very generous amount of pepper.
Add yeast (if you are using active dry yeast you will need to dissolve it in about  1/2 cup warm water first).
Add water a little bit at a time, working it in until a soft dough begins to form.
Add the lard and work it completely into the dough.
Continue working the dough, adding water as needed until the dough is just slightly damp and very elastic.
Cover with a kitchen towel and let rise 2 hr or more.

The Casatiello dough after the first rise

Meanwhile chop the salumi and cheese
Boil and chop the eggs and add them to the salumi mixture

After the dough has risen one hour, flour the work surface and roll it out into a large rectangular form.

Spread the salumi mixture across the length of the dough starting near the bottom of the dough.  

Roll the dough up like a cigar, pinch the edges and coat them with lard.

Roll up the Casatiello

Bring the ends together to form a circular shape.

Grease the Casatiello pan with lard, work the dough into the pan and generously coat the top of the dough with lard.

Cover and let rise 3 hours.

Casatiello after the second rise

Bake at 180º C for approximately 1 1/2 to 2 hours.

Buon Appetito!

In the first week of March, all Italy’s state museums are free

Fancy a few hours in the National Archaeological Museum, a stroll round the Caserta palace or catching the view from the Certosa di San Martino? Next week you can visit them all for free.

Scores of state-owned attractions across Italy will waive their entry fees from March 5-10th as part of an initiative to make the country’s most precious heritage available for free on 20 days each year.

Culture Minister Alberto Bonisoli has declared next Tuesday to Sunday “Museum Week”, meaning that locals and tourists alike have six days to visit some of Italy’s most famous museums, galleries and archaeological sites without paying a cent.

Some of the best-known attractions participating include the Museo e Real bosco di Capodimonte and Palazzo Reale, the ruins of Herculaneum – as well as its treasures in Naples’ Archeological Museum – the Complesso dei Girolamini and all the various villas of the ruins of Pompeii. Find a full list here.

The initiative replaces Italy’s “free museum Sundays”, the scheme that saw museums open for free every first Sunday of the month. Under a new decree that takes effect this week, Italian state museums will instead offer six free Sundays between October and March, eight free days of their choice and six during Museum Week.

Culture Minister Alberto Bonisoli says the new system should help reduce the long queues and oppressive crowds that typically gather at Italy’s most popular attractions every first Sunday of the month. Sites might choose to offer free entry on a weekday afternoon instead of at the weekend, for instance, to help them manage visitor numbers.

In addition, people aged 18-25 will be able to visit state-owned attractions at any time they choose for the reduced price of just €2.

Bonisoli has said that he wants to add even more free days in future, hinting that there could be two Museum Weeks a year from 2020.

Discovering the Blue Vase of Pompeii

Discovered at Pompeii on December 29, 1837, in the presence of King Ferdinand II, the Blue Vase is regarded by many to be the Naples National Archaeological Museum‘s most prized possession.

The Blue Vase is said to have been found in the House of the Mosaic Columns during a Royal inspection. Some have suggested it was planted to impress the noble visitors. Apparently, it was not uncommon for excavators to inhume their finds and wait for an opportune time to unearth the treasure in order to keep their patrons excited and the funds coming in.

Extremely fragile, Imperial Roman cameo glass vases are terrifically rare; only a handful survive. Perhaps the most famous specimen is the so-called Portland Vase in the British Museum.

They were made by fusing different colored sheets of glass together in a furnace. After cooling, the top layer was etched away, creating designs that stand out from the contrasting background. As with the Blue Vase, the most common color combination was the use of an opaque white over a translucent cobalt blue.

Beneath each handle of the Blue Vase the iconography depicts a group of pudgy putti gaily harvesting grapes for winemaking and playing musical instruments. Separating the two scenes are highly elaborate grape vines bearing clusters of fruit and some birds. The vines appear to be springing like antlers from the head of Silenus, the trusty companion of Dionysus, the god of wine. Circling the vessel’s base are flora and fauna from the Mediterranean. Fittingly, the glass vessel is shaped like a wine amphora.

Undoubtably the work of master craftsmen, this priceless masterpiece was truly a wonder to behold.

National Archaeological Museum is away only a few minutes walk from our apartment!

BEST QUOTES ABOUT NAPLES

We like to describe Naples as chaos incarnate. It has a life of its own, that seems to head in every direction at once, but then comes together into a sort of untouchable harmony that energizes your soul. And because I would love to let you know more about the city, we collected together our favorite quotes about Napoli.

In the shadow of Mt. Vesuvius, Naples has inspired writers and artists for centuries.

To recognize this unique city, here are the best quotes about Naples:

Rome is stately and impressive, Florence is all beauty and enchantment, Genoa is picturesque, Venice is a dream city, but Naples is simply — fascinating.
– Lilian Whiting

Naples is curiously chaotic and, if I’m honest, a bit dilapidated. It certainly has a ‘lived-in’ look. It’s alive, it’s vibrant, it’s a little bit dirty, it’s busy, and I loved it.
– Paul Hollywood

I won’t say another word about the beauties of the city and its situation, which have been described and praised often. As they say here, “Vedi Napoli e poi muori! See Naples and die!” One can’t blame the Neapolitan for never wanting to leave his city, nor its poets singing its praises in lofty hyperboles: it would be wonderful even if a few more Vesuviuses were to rise in the neighbourhood.
– Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Here we are at last. The Italian proverb says “See Naples and die” but I say, see Naples and live; for there seems a great deal worth living for.
– Arthur John Strutt

Naples is the flower of paradise. The last adventure of my life.
– Alexandre Dumas

I have a concept of Naples that is not so much of a city per se but rather an ingredient of the human spirit that I detect in everyone, Neapolitan or not. The idea that ‘Neapolitanism’ and mass ignorance are somehow indissolubly linked is one that I am prepared to fight with all the strength I have. Quite simply, I refuse to believe that the living conditions of a population can only be improved at the cost of annihilating everything human in their way of life. Indeed, there are times when I think that Naples represents the last remaining hope for the human race.
– Luciano De Crescenzo

I exist only because inside of me and above all else I am only and above all a Neapolitan. Naples exists inside of me, and always will. Fortunately for me there is this treasure that I have inside of me and, when I need it, then I pull it out.
– Sophia Loren

…the city of Naples was like this: wonderful from a distance, but when seen close up, it was fragmentary, indefinable, and coarse…
– Franco Di Mare

Naples sitteth by the sea, keystone of an arch of azure, Crowned by consenting nations peerless queen of gayety: She laugheth at the wrath of Ocean, she mocketh the fury of Vesuvius, She spurneth disease, and misery, and famine, that crowd her sunny streets.
Martin Farquhar Tupper

He who doesn’t love Naples, has yet to learn how to love life.
– Anonymous

Naples is a paradise: in it every one lives in a sort of intoxicated self-forgetfulness. It is even so with me: I scarcely know myself; I seem to myself quite an altered man. Yesterday I said to myself, “Either you have always been mad, or you are so now.”
– Johann Wolfgang von Goethe


Are there any other quotes about Naples that you love?

THINGS TO DO IN NAPLES IN DECEMBER

We are in December. December means Christmas, holidays, presents and sitting under the tree. But these aren’t the only things to do in December. Let’s find out some of the best events for this month.

HERE SOME EXHIBITIONS YOU CAN’T MISS IN DECEMBER

LONDON SHADOW. LA RIVOLUZIONE INGLESE DA GILBERT & GEORGE A DAMIEN HIRST

19/10/18 – 20/01/19The London Shadow exhibition recounts, through twenty-three works, the spirit of artistic renewal that began in Great Britain  (YBAYoung British Artists) in the late eighties and early nineties. At the end of the decade, these young artists finally glimpsed the possibility of breaking with the “old” generation imposing signs, messages and new expressive codes. Leader of the movement is Damien Hirst.

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EXPANDED INTERIORS

14/07/18 – 15/01/19Expanded Interiors explores ancient Roman wall paintings and Roman artefacts through fine-art practice at the two UNESCO World Heritage sites of Pompeii and Herculaneum. The project will develop site-specific fine art installations within two distinct architectural contexts: the House of the Cryptoporticus, in Pompeii, and the House of the Beautiful Courtyard, in Herculaneum. Expanded Interiors is planned by Newcastle University and brings together an experienced team from contemporary art, archaeology and digital technology.

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AN EXHIBITION FOR OLIMPIO GRECO

13/10/18 – 29/12/18. The retrospective exhibition dedicated to the Sicilian futurist and photographer Olimpio Greco, also called Grecolio. The exhibition, curated by Viktor Grobheiten, will present photos taken between 1919 and 1925. As Grobheiten says: maybe it’s time to shed light on Italian futurism artists, who didn’t have the visibility and the success they deserved. And it is certainly the case of Grecolio, a great interpreter of photodynamism.

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JEAN LOUP CHAMPION EXHIBITION

18/10/18 – 11/01/19The Mapils Gallery presents Bianchi i giorni che sovrastano le notti, from Jean Loup Champion. Jean-Loup offers an unpublished production realized in the last few years. The trauma caused by three consecutive liver transplants, made him discover, and then express, another body and another world, white and three – dimensional. In 2017, Jean-Loup Champion worked on a new series of works entitled Monumenti. These works refer to the Baroque funerary monuments of Naples and the Cy Twombly white sculptures. Made in wood and various materials, they are always painted in white.

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IL FUTURISMO (FUTURISM)

19/10/18 – 17/02/19. Works by BoccioniBallaCarràSeverini. Sixty-four masterpieces take us to the first and most important vanguard European Futurism of the early 1900s.

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KLIMT EXPERIENCE

20/10/18 – 03/02/19Klimt Experience is an immersive and multimedia journey dedicated to the life and works of Gustav Klimt. The main purpose is to thrill and fascinate the spectators, inviting them to deepen the knowledge of the man and artist and the understanding of his works. A multimedia jump in Klimt’s art and history. The exhibition includes the biography told by the monitors of the visual room, a magical kaleidoscope with signs and images projected on walls and ceilings in the hall of mirrorsvirtual reality with the Oculus VR. A different way to approach art, a dreamlike journey.

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PRESENZE ASSENZE 1978-2018

13/12/18 – 21/02/19. Peppe Esposito on show with his personal Presenze Assenze 1978 – 2018. 50 images between black and white photos and color portraits on display at the Private Baker Fideuram offices. A visual tale of Napoli, an ideal metropolis immortalized by the photographic eye of Esposito that conquers bodies and spaces, revealing the city’s many identities and its transformations, from 1978 to today.

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I DE FILIPPO. IL MESTIERE IN SCENA

8/11/18 – 24/04/19. Thanks to unpublished material, letters, photos, videos, costumes, posters, manuscripts and typescripts, this exhibition shows up like a some kind of dialogue between the De Filippo family and the public. People will meet Eduardo through the movies, through the poems, through the songs, will live his strength, his rigor, the importance that the theatre and the audience had for him and that took him not to stop even when life was terribly tough with him.

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ESCHER

01/11/18 – 22/04/19Palazzo delle Arti di Napoli will house the works of Maurits Cornelis Escher, one of the world’s most famous graphic artists. There will also be a large section dedicated to the influence that his work have had on subsequent generations: discs, comics, advertising, movies. A big journey through 200 works, from Escher to the present day.

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HERE SOME EVENTS YOU CAN’T MISS IN DECEMBER

DINOSAURI IN CARNE E OSSA (DINOSAURS IN FLESH AND BLOOD)

12/11/18 – 09/03/19. Dinosaurs are back, and they and they have established themselves at the. Astroni Crater, an extinct volcano just 5 km from Naples. It is a unique experience that helps us to reflect on a question: can you survive a mass extinction? A small group of survivors gave life to different species of animals, that have dominated the earth. Extinction is part of evolution, but over the past 350 years, our actions have placed the planet at risk of a new mass extinction. The exhibition tells the history of life, from Paleozoic till the present day.

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BRIKMANIA, UN MONDO DI MATTONCINI (A WORLD OF BRICKS)

13/10/18 – 27/01/19. The world’s biggest exhibition of Lego is here. 2 million of bricks, with vintage cars, pirate galleons and the Star Wars saga and an area with a pool full of bricks where children can play.

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I VENERDÌ DEL TAIJIQUAN (TAIJIQUAN FRIDAYS)

24/10/18 – 05/05/19Taijiquan is a Chinese fighting technique suitable for everyone and is based on a harmonious balance between body and mind, restoring the energy flow and psychophysical well-being.

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NATALE AL CASTELLO DI LETTERE (CHRISTMAS AT LETTERE CASTLE)

10/11/18 – 06/01/19. In the wonderful Archaeological park in Castello di Lettere, it will take place Natale al Castello. The Castle will be set up according to a traditional Christmas Market. The event, is the favourite destination for adults and children who spend a very special moment during the holidays, between tradition, games and typical tastings. With kiosks in which artisans, masters of the Neapolitan manger, producers and farms, will propose their creations.

MERCATINI AL CASTELLO DI OTTAVIANO (MARKETS AT THE OTTAVIANO CASTLE)

01/12/18 – 16/12/18. More than 100 exhibitors at the Mediceo Castle, organized in typical wooden houses, will offer a wide range of products. Christmas lights, artists, concerts, choirs and shows are the perfect setting for this typical Christmas atmosphere.

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MERCATINI DI NATALE 2018 (CHRISTMAS MARKETS 2018)

02/12/18 – 21/12/18. The National Railway Museum of Pietrarsa will be transformed into the city of the Christmas, giving visitors unforgettable emotions. If you visit the markets you can freely access and visit the National Railway Museum of Pietrarsa. Children can visit the house of Santa Claus, view the locomotives of the Polar Express, meeting characters from fairy tales and listening tales like Snow WhitePinocchio and The Pied Piper.

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CHRISTMAS IN THE MIDDLE AGES

10/12/18 – 24/12/18. For 14 days Borgo Martucci will turn into a historical road. Take a leap into the past and experience history in an original way. Ladies, knights, jugglers and minstrels, let yourself be guided towards the magic.

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HERE SOME THEATRICAL SHOWS YOU CAN’T MISS IN DECEMBER

MADE IN CHINA POSTCARDS FROM VAN GOGH

04/12/18 – 09/12/18. An original comparison between Van Gogh, the artistic genius, and China, the serial reproduction for commercial purposes. A very original show in which the reference made in China, suggests food for thought on contemporary society.

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POKER

07/12/18 – 09/12/18. A restaurant, the owner, his son, two waiters and the cook. Every Sunday after the closing, they go to the basement of the club to play poker all the night. This routine is broken by the arrival on the scene of a mysterious character. A character that brings to the life of the protagonists imbalance and curiosity, adding suspense to the developments of the story and, above all, to the game that will be played.

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COUS COUS KLAN

07/12/18 – 16/12/18. In a near future, the water is privatized and the rivers are guarded by the government guards. In an abandoned parking lot there is a homeless community, frayed by anger and conflict. Aldo and Nina, a rebellious and unpredictable girl, who will prove to be the biggest of their problems and, at the same time, the key to a social redemption, will be part of the community.

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AVEVO UN BEL PALLONE ROSSO (I HAD A BEAUTIFUL RED BALLOON)

11/12/18 – 16/12/18. Margherita is a young Catholic girl who, after moving to Milan, in a few years becomes “Mara”, leader of the Red Brigades. The show, through the conversations between her and her father, tells the story of Margherita and outlines the intimate and dramatic relationship between father and daughter, which mixes with the history of Italy.

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LE HO MAI RACCONTATO DEL VENTO DEL NORD

12/12/18 – 16/12/18. A wrong e-mail address, triggers a spark between 2 strangers. Based on the book by Daniel Glattauer, with millions of copies sold all over the world, the show describes the birth of an intense and virtual bond. Can a relationship of this kind survive to a real meeting?

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NEW MAGIC PEOPLE SHOW

14/12/18 – 16/12/18. In 2007, with Magic People Show, Giuseppe Montesano told the global consumer, the average human being, the slave of the advertising, and then, national economy healers, air to breathe sellers, souls sellers and buyers. Ten years later a new version of the show, which mixes opera buffs and drama, made up of ridiculous monsters drugged by the dream of money, of deluded prisoners of being free and people who have buried passion and love. A new tragicomic chapter of the sick Italy.

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GHOST TOUR. GHOSTS IN NAPLES

09/11/18 – 30/12/18. Do you believe in paranormal activities? With this tour, the De Rebus Neapolis, which represents the Paranormal Research and Analysis Center in Naples, will explore the results of a surprising survey in the alleys of the ancient center of Naples. This tour will provide some precious knowledge to all those who want to approach to the paranormal. The purpose is to make contact with the occult.

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ANGELI E DEMONI. A TOUR IN THE MOST MYSTERIOUS CHURCHES IN NAPLES

16/11/18 – 28/12/18. The history, the anecdotes, the curiosities about the three churches of mystery: Church of Gesù Nuovo, Basilica of San Domenico Maggiore and the Basilica of Santa Chiara. Ghosts, angels and other entities, a walk that will tell the miracles, the mysteries and the paranormal. Every corner and every facade of these churches carries a hidden history.

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HERE SOME CONCERTS YOU CAN’T MISS IN DECEMBER

CHRISTMAS CONCERT WITH THE 3 TENORS

08/12/18 – 29/12/18. In the wonderful Filangieri museum, a work inspired by the concert La traviata, from Luciano PavarottiJosé Carreras and Placido Domingo. Between the great Italian opera and the Neapolitan tradition, and speaking of Neapolitan tradition, O’ Sole mio and Torna a Surriento, are just a couple of the songs in which the tenors protagonists of this evening will challenge themselves.   

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CHRISTMAS CONCERT

22/12/18. Orchestra of the San Carlo Theatre, with the participation of the Sanitansamble Orchestra.

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THE NUTCRACKER

29/12/18 – 05/12/18. The famous ballet adapted from E. T. A. Hoffmann’s story “The Nutcracker and the Mouse King

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